Contemplations On An At-Sea Day

With our week-long cruise reaching its end, we only had one last at-sea day to relax and enjoy our surroundings. A ship or boat occasionally appeared to break up the endless horizon.

Mid-morning, Dr. Jorge Arocha, a professor of philosophy at the University of Havana, gave an entertaining presentation on The musicality of the Cuban people and unusual Cuban musical instruments. Dr. Arocha discussed the importance of music and dancing to the Cuban people, and described some of the African and European influences on Cuban musicality. A band member, whose name I can’t remember, demonstrated some unique Cuban music and instruments.

A shekere, originating from West Africa, is a dried gourd filled with beads.

A guiro is also a gourd, played with a scraper.

Double-headed Batá drums.

Son is a Cuban musical style with its own distinctive beat.

Fruit and veggie carvings on display in the buffet.

The Latin Souls, a local Havana band, entertained us throughout the cruise.

After lunch, cruise director Danny introduced the Canadian Renfrew Highland Pipe and Drums Band. With the Cuban Government’s permission, the band played in public plazas at each port of call, and they gave a special performance for us that day.

Flag bearers

The members came from all over Canada.

They performed a touching rendition of Amazing Grace. I think bagpipes sound hauntingly beautiful, and Amazing Grace is a powerfully emotional song. Hearing the two together, especially while grieving for my mom, left me in tears.

That afternoon, we watched a documentary on Cuba. It spoke of the Cuban people’s many challenges and their growth throughout the years, which left me contemplating all I’d learned during my visit.

Based on little more than ignorance, I’d gone to Cuba with preconceived ideas. I assumed it was a deprived country, suffering under oppressive Communist rule, and I expected to find the people downtrodden and impoverished. Mostly, I was wrong.

While Cubans certainly aren’t rolling in money and have few material possessions, their wealth is defined in other ways. Cuba is culturally rich and architecturally superb, with unbelievably luxuriant landscapes. Cubans take pride in their arts and culture, and their high literacy rates. They aren’t defined by communism; they’re indomitable and adaptable despite communism. They’re proud, passionate people, who show affection easily and often. Cheek pressed to cheek with air kisses, and exuberant hugs, are common greetings. Cubans love their sports and are as obsessed with baseball as we are with hockey.

Basically, Cubans, young and old, dress much like we do. Some modest, some more chic.

This fine fellow reminds me of a musician from days gone by.

Popular North American logos might be missing from their clothing, but the younger generation dress as fashionably as their American counterparts. Hair styles are also every bit as current.

Not once did anyone push communist ideals on us. Politics were only mentioned on tours and during Dr. Arocha’s lectures, strictly as an explanatory topic. I kind of almost understand why the “little people” may have loved Fidel Castro. He gave them free healthcare, free education, jobs, essential food, and places to live. It came at a cost to their basic freedoms, but for those who had nothing, they came to accept those sacrifices.

I can also see why the vast majority, especially the wealthy, intensely hated Castro. He took everything away from them. Not only their material possessions, but also their hopes and dreams. If they were fortunate, they escaped the island with what little they could take with them. Anyone opposing Castro’s government often found themselves imprisoned, tortured or killed. Like Fulgencio Batista before him, Castro was a brutal dictator who ruled with an iron fist.

Life is slowly improving for Cubans. Although they still have little disposable income, they can go into business for themselves, own property, and have more of the basic freedoms we take for granted, such as limited access to the internet.

After that enlightening documentary, Dr. Arocha did a presentation called Cuban cigars: the story behind the smoke. I left Hubby to learn about the country’s beloved “Habanos”, while I went to our cabin to pack our suitcases.

Another dramatic, cloudy sunset.

Because our beach day got cancelled, Celestyal Cruises gave us an on-board credit that just happened to cover the complete cost of our photo package, including a DVD on Havana. A serendipitous bit of luck.

The evening entertainment, Revolucion, a love story at the time of the revolution, was excellent. It told the poignant tale of a Cuban and an American who fell in love just before the revolution that severed ties between those two countries. And how, as elderly people, they found their way back to each other, thanks the current thawing in relations.

The talented young Cuban cast.

Fitbit says we covered a paltry 5.91 kilometers that day.

Next Monday I’ll share our last day in Cuba, including photos taken from Havana Bay. Click here for next post. Follow my Cuban posts from the beginning here.

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One thought on “Contemplations On An At-Sea Day

  1. Pingback: Santiago de Cuba, Take Two | joyceholmes

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