Santiago de Cuba, Take Two

After a stimulating morning touring the city of Santiago de Cuba, we were ready to kick back and relax in the balmy Cuban sun aboard the Celestyal Crystal. It’s always fun to search the surrounding skyline, in hopes of spotting places we’d just visited.

We could only pick out the twin spires of the Metropolitan Cathedral.

The government boat, waiting to escort our cruise ship out of the harbour, was a sad reminder our visit to Santiago was soon coming to an end.

Tourists aren’t allowed to take Cuban pesos out of the country, and we worried about finding an exchange at the airport, so after lunch we went to the cruise terminal’s money exchange to cash out our CUCs.

I wish we’d had time to wander around the attractive pier next to the terminal.

Several people were fishing off the pier. And interesting to note, most of them only used a line with no pole.

And we’re off into the sparkling sunshine.

Sierra Maestra Mountains

The escort boat meets the pilot-boat.

Some stylish houses along the bay.

Up on the bluff, overlooking the entrance to Santiago Bay, stands a bronze statue of Frank Pais. A contemporary of Castro, and a commander of the Revolutionary Movement by time he was twenty, Frank Pais was mysteriously assassinated in Santiago, at the young age of twenty-three.

Many shoreline homes are modest and even slightly decrepit.

That last photo intrigued me into enlarging it to get a closer look at that little captured moment in time. It appears to be three generations of a family gathered on the porch of a very rundown home, yet they’re all smiling and happy just to be together.

Approaching Castillo de San Pedro de la Roca.

I don’t know if this is part of El Morro Castle or if it’s the remains of a military battery. Would be fun to explore it.

Seeing El Morro Castle close-up from the water, makes me wish even more that I’d had the time to thoroughly check it out when we were there that morning.

My writer’s imagination came to life when I saw these mysterious caves at the base of the fortress. I wonder where they go?

The only thing better than a castle is a castle with a lighthouse. I love lighthouses.

One last goodbye glimpse of Santiago de Cuba and Castillo de San Pedro de la Roca.

Fluffy clouds above the Sierra Maestras, and sunshine on a blue sea. Idyllic.

The waters of the Caribbean always amaze me. Gorgeous azure and turquoise in the shallows, and an incredible deep navy when out to sea.

As the afternoon wore on, clouds thickened in the sky. At one point, the sun broke through to bathe these small hills in bright light.

Foreshadowing a dramatic sunset.

A distant sighting of the infamous Guantanamo Bay.

The sunset lived up to expectations.

Right to its breathtaking end.

This is Danny, the cruise director. Besides being a super friendly, outgoing fellow, Danny, who’s from Romania, is also fluent in at least seven or eight languages. I was so impressed with how he transitions flawlessly back and forth between all those different tongues. I’m barely fluent in my own native language, never mind attempting any other ones.

The evening show, Afro-Cuba – forkloric traditions of the afro-Cubans, told the spellbinding story of the African kidnappings and arrival on the island as slaves, and their transition through the years to where they are as Cuban citizens today.

We walked 9.86 kilometers that day, according to Fitbit.

Next Monday, I’ll share my sea day contemplations of Cuba. Click here for next post.

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One thought on “Santiago de Cuba, Take Two

  1. Pingback: Historic Santiago de Cuba | joyceholmes

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