Not All Sundays, But Certainly All Fundays

On the last day of June, Hubby and I took advantage of one of those two for one deals to take a trip to the Kamloops Wildlife Park.

We left early that morning, and the two-hour drive was lovely in the sunshine. Needless to say, we immediately got lost in Kamloops. In fact, I can’t remember a time when we haven’t gotten lost in that small city.

We arrived at the park in time for the grizzly bear feeding. I envisioned them tearing away at chunks of raw meat, but reality is far different. Staff actually hide the food – salmon, berries, veggies – all over the enclosure, and then release the bears to hunt for it, much as they do in the wilderness.

1 Grizzlies, Kamloops Wildlife Park 2 Grizzlies, Kamloops Wildlife Park 3 Grizzlies, Kamloops Wildlife Park

 

The Birds of Prey Exhibit holds many winged hunters, including this great grey owl.

4 Great Grey Owl, Kamloops Wildlife Park

A red-tailed hawk.

5 Red tailed hawk, Kamloops Wildlife Park

The bald eagles and golden eagles share the same enclosure, but they’re not real chummy. When a golden eagle invaded the bald eagles’ side for a drink of water, a noisy ruckus ensued.

8 Golden Eagles, Kamloops Wildlife Park

6 Bald Eagle, Kamloops Wildlife Park 9 Golden Eagle, Kamloops Wildlife Park

7 Bald Eagle, Kamloops Wildlife Park

I obviously don’t measure up well with a bald eagle.

10 Kamloops Wildlife Park

The Bactrian Camels were snoozy in the sunshine.

11 Bactrian Camel, Kamloops Wildlife Park 12 Bactrian Camels, Kamloops Wildlife Park

The Llama was snoozy in the shade.

12a Llama, Kamloops Wildlife Park

Snoozy seemed to be the theme of the day.

We tried twice to find the elusive Kermode Bear, but the closest we got to seeing him with through the camera’s zoom.

14 Kermode Bear, Kamloops Wildlife Park

Bighorn sheep

13 Bighorn sheep, Kamloops Wildlife Park

Rocky Mountain Elk

15 Rocky Mtn Elk, Kamloops Wildlife Park 16 Rocky Mtn Elk, Kamloops Wildlife Park

The cougars and lynx were disappointing no-shows, and we only caught a glimpse of a moose lying down.

24 Moose, Kamloops Wildlife Park

The two grey wolves reminded me of large dogs. What handsome creatures.

17 Grey wolf, Kamloops Wildlife Park 18 Grey wolf, Kamloops Wildlife Park

A park employee roused the black bears with the promise of snacks. The female woke up first and headed to the pond in search of apples.

19 Black bears, Kamloops Wildlife Park 20 Black bears, Kamloops Wildlife Park

When the larger male arrived, the female backed away.

21 Black bears, Kamloops Wildlife Park 22 Black bears, Kamloops Wildlife Park

My first close encounter with a coyote. Kinda cute.

23 Coyote, Kamloops Wildlife Park

The peacock was strutting its stuff, as peacocks tend to do.

25 Kamloops Wildlife Park

I flushed this little marmot out from under a cart and he rushed to ‘hide’ in the corner, keeping an eye on me through the reflective window. Clever fellow.

26 Marmot, Kamloops Wildlife Park

Our three-hour visit ended in the discovery centre, where this adorable little burrowing owl lives.

27 Burrowing Owl, Kamloops Wildlife Park

We took Roxy to Kelowna’s Waterfront Park the next day for Canada Day festivities. And mini-donuts!

28 Canada Day 28a

I was thrilled to get a glimpse of the baby osprey, and even more pleased that my crappy little camera sort of captured a shot of one.

29 Ospreys, Rotary Marsh 30 Ospreys, Rotary Marsh

The first Sunday Funday in July was especially fun because our daughter-in-law and Daisy joined us for a hike up the Boucherie Rush Trail. Mount Boucherie, the nub of an ancient volcano, is on the west side of Okanagan Lake, and this was our first time exploring it.

31 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

At approximately seven kms, roundtrip, and with an elevation change of 274 metres, the Boucherie Rush is almost twice as long as Knox’s Apex Trail with a similar change in elevation. I prefer the leisurely switchbacks over Apex’s steeper route.

34 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Daisy loves to lead the way.

32 Daisy, Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Impressive lake views were plentiful.

33 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail 46 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Volcanic rock lined the trail, a reminder of this mountain’s origins.

37 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail 44 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail 45 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

 

Refreshment break

36 Daisy getting a drink, Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Shannon Lake

38 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Okanagan Lake, looking northward

39. Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Summit of Rush Trail, looking east and south. It was cool to view Okanagan Mountain, where we’d hiked the week prior, from across the lake.

40 Mount Boucherie Rush Summitt 41 Mount Boucherie Rush Summitt

Daisy posed for this picture all by herself. So adorable.

42 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Going down was as easy as going up.

43 Mount Boucherie Rush Trail

Yes, I shared lick or two of my cone afterward.

47 Daisy enjoying an ice cream cone

We set off the next Sunday in search of great lake views, choosing to explore Stephen Coyote Ridge. This area, located not far from the landfill in Glenmore, is classified as a conservation park and has no marked trails, which made me a little nervous. Not wanting to end up as a rescue story on the Five O’Clock News, Hubby left the occasional blue breadcrumb to mark our way.

51 Stephens Coyote Ridge

With no clear directions, we wandered here and there, and here again, enjoying the peacefulness and variety of trails, but never did stumble across any lake views.

48 Stephens Coyote Ridge 52 Stephens Coyote Ridge 53 Stephens Coyote Ridge 55 Stephens Coyote Ridge 56 Stephens Coyote Ridge 57 Stephens Coyote Ridge

 

When thunder rumbled overhead and the sky began to darken, we headed back to the car.

58 Storm clouds coming, Stephens Coyote Ridge

On the way home, we happened across a road sign for Robert Lake Regional Park and decided on a detour to check it out. An incredibly picturesque spot, Robert Lake is a salt flat and home to several species of birds.

59. Robert Lake Reg Park 60 Robert Lake Reg Park

We saw a few ducks and lots of Canada Geese.

61 Robert Lake Reg Park 62 Robert Lake Reg Park 63 Geese, Robert Lake Reg Park 64 Geese, Robert Lake Reg Park

 

I thought these little guys were sandpipers, but they’re called Wilson’s Phalarope. Cute, anyway.

66 Wilson's Phalarope, Robert Lake Reg Park 67 Wilson's Phalarope, Robert Lake Reg Park 68 Wilson's Phalarope, Robert Lake Reg Park

 

Summer’s flying by, but stay tuned for more Sunday Fundays in the coming weeks.

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